Xpert Slider

Compost Yields Healthy Crops

which promotes increased water retention and nutrient absorption for plant growth. Compost also provides a feedstock for essential microorganisms in the soil that aid plants and roots.

Utilizing Food Scraps in Compost

returns a nutrient rich soil amendment back to the earth and diverts roughly 30% of waste volumes sent to landfill annually in Illinois. 

Integrating Food Scraps Through Collection

drives demand from the bottom up, creating broader diversion opportunities for food scrap generators and haulers.

Wasting 40% of Food Supply

increases the need for more production of food crops. If efficiencies can be found in this system, the same amount of food can find its way to feed more people.

Restaurant Composting

 

Business/Institutional Composting

 
 
 

Residential Composting

 
 
 

Economic Impact and Market Study

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

economic impact report coverBuilding on the 2015 Food Scrap Composting Challenges and Solutions in Illinois Report produced by recent collaboration with the Illinois Food Scrap Coalition (IFSC), Seven Generations Ahead (SGA) contracted Skumatz Economic Research Associates (SERA) to identify the problems associated with landfilling organics, food scraps in particular, and recommend solutions emphasizing the development of the Illinois sustainable food industry.

The goals of the project were to examine the influence of expanded food scraps recovery and composting programs on improving the viability of commercial composting ventures in Illinois, driving Illinois-based food production, and enhancing the local food economy in Illinois, including jobs and revenues.

The analyses in this report indicate that the three targeted organic materials – food scraps, compostable yard waste (not including woody materials), and compostable paper-- represent significant recoverable resources. Diverting the three target materials would reduce 22% of tons disposed, and 16% of the MTCO2e available from all the non-recovered recyclables and organics disposed annually in Illinois. Using estimates of future prices of carbon dioxide, the value of the carbon dioxide represented by the target food scraps is $54 million - $89 million annually (2020 prices).

Download the Economic Impact and Market Study Report: Elements of the Case for Advancing Food Scrap Composting Industry and the Link to Building Illinois' Local Food Economy and read about recommended programs for increased organics diversion, with an emphasis on food scraps.